Landscaping NZ
Yates
Waimea Nurseries
Herb Herbert
Tui - A Friend In Your Garden
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June Gardening

June is all about new seasons roses arriving in store. Most flower gardeners consider it unthinkable to create a garden without roses. They can lift your garden out of the ordinary simply by using them draped along walls, covering arches across paths, planted as shrubs to flaunt their beauty in an otherwise ho–hum border, twined around pillars or growing in pots.

While rose planting time is here, before you rush into the garden with the spade in one hand and the rose in the other, it is important to select a position that receives at least half a days’ sunshine and soil with good drainage. Remember, the answer is in the soil.  It is important to realise that soil is a living thing and, like the gardener, it can become tired or sick so we must treat our soil with respect.

Preparing the rose garden with some good digging will improve drainage and introduce air into the soil.

Soil is made up of bits of rock, water, rotted vegetation and decomposing leaves. Heavy clay soil is made up of very fine minute particles of rock and in most cases there is not enough air for plant roots and they bang their roots against hard walls of clay. Light sandy soil is a grainy mix of larger particles of rock that has too much air and plants are not able to cling and absorb nutrients. A mixture of the two is just perfect. Mulching with leaves and compost will allow the earthworms to drag the humus underground. Composts add bulk to sandy soil and air to heavy soil. During our tidy up in the garden we whisked away the natural composting leaves so now it is important to offset our tidying by blanketing the soil with Nichols organic or mushroom compost.

Roses will try to grow no matter how we plant them but there are a few tasks that we can do to help them on their journey. First of all dig a hole twice as big as you first thought and loosen the earth at the bottom of the hole. Mix some Tui Rose Compost into the bottom of the hole and then settle the plant in the hole with the graft (knobby bit) one centimetre below the surface. Spread the roots around in all directions. Replace half the soil with a little more rose compost, firm and water in, and then top up with the remaining soil, firm and water again. When the root ball has been firmed and watered there shouldn’t be any spaces where roots are left in a pocket of air and desperately searching for some soil to cling to.

Now is the time to apply winter clean up sprays onto our roses and fruit trees. If you do no other spraying during the year, treat your fruit trees and roses to a couple of winter clean-up sprays ... you will be pleasantly surprised at the difference a winter spray will make to the health of your fruit trees and rose bushes.

First of all use Yates Lime Sulphur to wipe out fungus diseases. Three weeks later, spray with Yates Liquid Copper to kill bacteria and follow up with Yates Conqueror Oil to smother any scale and eggs of aphids and mites.

Remove any saucers from underneath your terracotta and ceramic outdoor pots and they will be less likely to crack in the frost if they are well drained. Raise pots onto ‘pot feet’ or short bits of bamboo or kindling cut to fit under the pot and this will solve the problem of drainage over winter.

Rejuvenate some of these pots with brightly coloured winter-flowering polyanthus, primula, pansies and violas. They will provide a cheerful splash of colour during those cold days of winter that lay ahead.

Apply a side dressing of dried blood to polys and prims to prolong the flowering periods, particularly if heavy rains may have leached away valuable soil nutrients. They will reward you ten-fold for feeding them!

 

Peonies, with their buxom flaunting flowers, have been described as being like roses without thorns. All our grannies grew them. They are among the least demanding of all perennials and grow very successfully with little more than good drainage, a cold winter and a bit of fertile soil.

Peonies need moisture during spring but little else afterwards and are amongst the most drought resistant perennials. Even though the sun in summer and autumn bakes the ground the tubers remain plump and firm, retaining nutrients for their growth next year. (Pictured right: Peony ‘Coral Sunset’)

Select a site that will receive plenty of sunshine and make the planting hole deep enough to bury the plump red sprouting shoots approx 4 or 5cm below the surface. It is said that the first year the peony sleeps, the next year it creeps and the third year it leaps.

Peonies are a long-term investment and can give you pleasure for forty years or more. Choose their position carefully because peonies hate disturbance and can take another two seasons to settle back into flowering routine. 

It’s also a great time to add some winter colour to your garden, in the form of Hellebores. They come in a range of colours and shades of white, green, pink and purple.

Hellebores love the shade and are at home in the dappled shade of larger trees and shrubs. They prefer average soil moisture and an occasional feed of plant food is enough to keep them happy. Apart from that, they are one of the hardiest perennials you will probably come across! 

In the vegetable garden plant shallots in free draining soil where they will get all day sunshine. Press each bulb firmly into the soil leaving the top half above ground.

While shallots are a member of the onion family, they are formed more like garlic than onions. Shallots are favoured for their mild, sweet onion flavour and are a real treat in any cook’s kitchen!

Garlic, the natural antibiotic, should be planted in a position that receives plenty of sunshine. Detach each clove from the mother plant and bury half the clove in soil leaving half the clove above ground.

And lastly, as the colder weather closes in, it's a good time to spare a thought for our feathered friends in the garden. We have a fantastic range of bird feeders, seed, nectar feeders and more in-store to attract birds to the garden.

Apart from that, Winter is here so plump up the cushions, flop into your favourite chair with books and plant catalogues, ‘google’ interesting gardening ideas and dream up your next garden project!  

Happy Gardening Everyone

And you don’t have to have green fingers to grow tasty vegetables ... simply give the soil a start by lightly forking in some Nichols Compost, a light dusting of fertiliser, remove a few weeds and you are ready to go!  Frequent hoeing of the soil allows the sunshine to warm the soil.

 

Make the most of these sunny days to sow a few spring onions, early carrots, spinach, radish, snowball turnip as well as some early potatoes such as Jersey Benne, Liseta, Swift, or Rocket. Digging the humble spud is part of the magic and mystery of gardening ... it’s like buried treasure!

 

Broccoli is absolutely choc-o-block full of vitamins. And the common cabbage has become a designer plant now with round heads, conical heads, some with puckered leafy heads and purple heads but all are packed with vitamins. Then there are our simply superb club-root resistant ‘Success’ cabbage plants. Our customers are singing the praises of this new discovery.

 

Don’t forget to lay some slug bait around all your new seedlings because snails love nice tender vegetable plants too, and, believe it or not, they can gobble eight times their body weight in just one night!

 

TOMATO PLANTING time is here again.

 

There are an astounding number of varieties in all shapes and sizes – just remember, whatever the variety, always buy sturdy plants that have a short space between leaf joints.  Plants that are tall and puny have been grown in overcrowded conditions and will never thrive or fruit well.

 

Nichols tomato plants are grown here in the south. There are brand new hybrids as well as the old favourites, not to mention my favourite - TastyTom - which is just the perfect ‘snax biscuit’ size and ever so sweet to eat.

 

The aristocrats of the tomato family are our ’X Generation’ grafted tomato plants which are strong and healthy - and the healthier the plant, the more resistant it is to diseases.

 

Plant each tomato plant at least 5cm deeper than they were in the punnet into fresh clean soil. And don’t over water in the early stages - small plants don’t need much water and wet cold soil is far too cold for tiny new roots to grow away strongly. Space the plants for good air circulation because planted too closely will result in weak spindly plants.

 

Tomatoes need tying to a stake, or twined up strong strings hanging from the glasshouse roof, and laterals (these are the side shoots at the junction of leaf and stem) should be pinched out as they appear.

 

 

 

 

 

It’s a glorious time of year with warm sunshine turning the garden into green and gold as daffodils shout ‘we are back again’ as they nod their heads in the breeze.

 

The Primula brigade are starting their spring performance as well. Our garden centres have a wonderful range of Ballerina and Barnhaven double primroses in shades of lilac, plum and pink which are truly irresistible as well as lovely soft colours of lemon, apricot and white.

 

Look out for the Candelabra Primulas with tiered swirls of flowers carried on long stems, flowering until early summer, in sumptuous tones of crimson with dark eyes of purple or red to softer pink tints.

 

Boronia Megastigma or Brown Boronia is one of the most loved fragrances of spring and always a winner in our garden centre.  Though they have a reputation of being a short lived shrub they are so worthwhile. 

 

And here’s a couple of tips to improve your success ... It’s important to know that the brown boronia are an Australian bog plant and so if planted in a cooler semi-shade position with compost they will grow much better than the hot sunny place most of us choose, where their poor roots frizzle in the heat. The other secret is to cut back the plant by one third, after flowering, then mulch with compost.

 

 

 

Magnolias are among the most glamorous trees or shrubs. They range from deciduous shrubs to magnificent tall evergreen trees. Early magnolias furry buds are now rapidly opening on naked branches so that we can enjoy their lovely goblet blooms.  We have a fantastic range now in stock at Nichols, and it’s a fantastic time to plant trees and shrubs, before the heat of late Spring and Summer sets in. (Pictured: Magnolia ‘Ian’s Red’)

 

Spring suggests blossom and the Crab-apples are charming garden trees that have the prettiest pink and white blossom then later delight us when their autumn fruits appear. Crab apples are the perfect trees for small gardens with their pleasing shapes.

 

The Clematis tribe arrive this month. If space is at a premium put in a pole or two and this will allow you to grow more than would otherwise be possible as well as adding much more interest to your border. When planting clematis give them a good start in life and dig a decent sized hole, work in some compost and plant so that the stem is at least 10cm deeper than what the base is now.

 

For a large sunny wall there is nothing more beautiful than Wisteria with long racemes of lilac blo

You can’t beat home grown vegetables for real freshness with all their vitamins intact.

 

And you don’t have to have green fingers to grow tasty vegetables ... simply give the soil a start by lightly forking in some Nichols Compost, a light dusting of fertiliser, remove a few weeds and you are ready to go!  Frequent hoeing of the soil allows the sunshine to warm the soil.

 

Make the most of these sunny days to sow a few spring onions, early carrots, spinach, radish, snowball turnip as well as some early potatoes such as Jersey Benne, Liseta, Swift, or Rocket. Digging the humble spud is part of the magic and mystery of gardening ... it’s like buried treasure!

 

Broccoli is absolutely choc-o-block full of vitamins. And the common cabbage has become a designer plant now with round heads, conical heads, some with puckered leafy heads and purple heads but all are packed with vitamins. Then there are our simply superb club-root resistant ‘Success’ cabbage plants. Our customers are singing the praises of this new discovery.

 

Don’t forget to lay some slug bait around all your new seedlings because snails love nice tender vegetable plants too, and, believe it or not, they can gobble eight times their body weight in just one night!

 

TOMATO PLANTING time is here again.

 

There are an astounding number of varieties in all shapes and sizes – just remember, whatever the variety, always buy sturdy plants that have a short space between leaf joints.  Plants that are tall and puny have been grown in overcrowded conditions and will never thrive or fruit well.

 

Nichols tomato plants are grown here in the south. There are brand new hybrids as well as the old favourites, not to mention my favourite - TastyTom - which is just the perfect ‘snax biscuit’ size and ever so sweet to eat.

 

The aristocrats of the tomato family are our ’X Generation’ grafted tomato plants which are strong and healthy - and the healthier the plant, the more resistant it is to diseases.

 

Plant each tomato plant at least 5cm deeper than they were in the punnet into fresh clean soil. And don’t over water in the early stages - small plants don’t need much water and wet cold soil is far too cold for tiny new roots to grow away strongly. Space the plants for good air circulation because planted too closely will result in weak spindly plants.

 

Tomatoes need tying to a stake, or twined up strong strings hanging from the glasshouse roof, and laterals (these are the side shoots at the junction of leaf and stem) should be pinched out as they appear.

 

 

 

 

 

It’s a glorious time of year with warm sunshine turning the garden into green and gold as daffodils shout ‘we are back again’ as they nod their heads in the breeze.

 

The Primula brigade are starting their spring performance as well. Our garden centres have a wonderful range of Ballerina and Barnhaven double primroses in shades of lilac, plum and pink which are truly irresistible as well as lovely soft colours of lemon, apricot and white.

 

Look out for the Candelabra Primulas with tiered swirls of flowers carried on long stems, flowering until early summer, in sumptuous tones of crimson with dark eyes of purple or red to softer pink tints.

 

Boronia Megastigma or Brown Boronia is one of the most loved fragrances of spring and always a winner in our garden centre.  Though they have a reputation of being a short lived shrub they are so worthwhile. 

 

And here’s a couple of tips to improve your success ... It’s important to know that the brown boronia are an Australian bog plant and so if planted in a cooler semi-shade position with compost they will grow much better than the hot sunny place most of us choose, where their poor roots frizzle in the heat. The other secret is to cut back the plant by one third, after flowering, then mulch with compost.

 

 

 

Magnolias are among the most glamorous trees or shrubs. They range from deciduous shrubs to magnificent tall evergreen trees. Early magnolias furry buds are now rapidly opening on naked branches so that we can enjoy their lovely goblet blooms.  We have a fantastic range now in stock at Nichols, and it’s a fantastic time to plant trees and shrubs, before the heat of late Spring and Summer sets in. (Pictured: Magnolia ‘Ian’s Red’)

 

Spring suggests blossom and the Crab-apples are charming garden trees that have the prettiest pink and white blossom then later delight us when their autumn fruits appear. Crab apples are the perfect trees for small gardens with their pleasing shapes.

 

The Clematis tribe arrive this month. If space is at a premium put in a pole or two and this will allow you to grow more than would otherwise be possible as well as adding much more interest to your border. When planting clematis give them a good start in life and dig a decent sized hole, work in some compost and plant so that the stem is at least 10cm deeper than what the base is now.

 

For a large sunny wall there is nothing more beautiful than Wisteria with long racemes of lilac blossom and there are lots of these arriving this month too.

 

If  the scent of Sweet Peas matters to you we have ten different enchanting varieties of Dr. Hammet's sweet pea plants in a whole range of colours from ‘Almost Black’ and navy to pinks through to bright lipstick reds.

 

A new consignment of Hostas has arrived with their big expanse of leaves that make scintillating focal points in the garden and soothe the eye. They look superb mass planted in a semi-shaded area in your garden.

 

And lastly, it’s time to plant Dahlias which are a must for pure brilliance of flower colours combined with beautiful shapes, some with interesting purple-black foliage.

 

by Clare Scott,

Nichol’s Invercargill

ssom and there are lots of these arriving this month too.

 

If  the scent of Sweet Peas matters to you we have ten different enchanting varieties of Dr. Hammet's sweet pea plants in a whole range of colours from ‘Almost Black’ and navy to pinks through to bright lipstick reds.

 

A new consignment of Hostas has arrived with their big expanse of leaves that make scintillating focal points in the garden and soothe the eye. They look superb mass planted in a semi-shaded area in your garden.

 

And lastly, it’s time to plant Dahlias which are a must for pure brilliance of flower colours combined with beautiful shapes, some with interesting purple-black foliage.

 

by Clare Scott,

Nichol’s Invercargill