Landscaping NZ
Yates
Waimea Nurseries
Herb Herbert
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Berryfruit

Berry fruit have become popular in recent years because of their great taste and their proven health properties.

Most berry fruits produce crops on small easily managed plants. Brambles require some type of  fence support, but others form small easily managed bushes.

At a Glance:

  • Need a warm, sunny site
  • Choose fruits and varieties best suited to your area
  • Fertilise and water

Some berry fruit, such as strawberries have  always been popular. But others, such as  raspberries, boysenberries, blackberries, currants, and blueberries have all become popular because of their vitamin rich and anti-oxidant content. In addition they are great  tasting and are relatively easy to grow.

Where to Plant

Choose a warm sunny position, sheltered from strong winds. Brambles (raspberries, boysenberries, blackberries) will grow in most soils.  Blueberries require a free draining but moist soil which is acidic (do not use lime or dolomite).

Strawberries require a free draining soil with lots of organic compost. They should not be grown in the same soil for more than two years consecutively.

In clay soils, raise plantings and add lots of Nichols Organic Compost. 

When to Plant

Brambles are sometimes available in winter as ‘bare root’ plants, but its best to buy them late spring in pots. 

Blueberries and grapes are available most of the year, but most commonly in summer.

Strawberries are available as ‘bare root’ plants in May—June or as plants in punnets or pots in spring.



Mulching

This is a highly recommended practice as it suppresses weeds and conserves moisture in the soil.  A layer of mulch, compost or similar, laid on the surface in October, will prevent moisture loss and greatly benefit the plants.


After Care …

Feeding

Berry fruit generally benefit from an annual dressing of lime or gypsum in August, followed by an application of Tui General Garden Fertiliser in September.

Note: For blueberries, Gypsum can be used but do not use lime.

Use an acid fertiliser such as Tui Acid Fertiliser.

 

 

Watering

Many berryfruit can withstand considerable dry periods, but watering will greatly improve the result.

Pests and Diseases

Although there are a number of pests and diseases that can attack berry fruit, they tend to be of lesser significance or easily controlled.

CLICK HERE for detailed information on Fruit Pest and Disease Control.

Pruning

Most berry fruits grow on bushes or vines. Hence there is little required to shaping.

Pruning for continuous crops, and to keep the bush/vine under control, requires some attention.

Raspberries are upright canes and fruit on new seasons growth which originates from the previous years new canes that have emerged from the soil. 

Therefore in July, cut out all old canes which carried last seasons crop. These canes are distinguished from the one year canes which you want to retain, by their grey colour, and usually by this time dry brittle wood. The canes to be retained tend to be light brown in colour and still very green and alive. These retained canes can then be shortened back to about two thirds their height.

Tying 5—6 canes together at the top is a common practice to help keep them upright when new growth starts in spring. The new canes for the following year’s crop will emerge and grow in late spring summer. They will require tying up for support.

Boysenberries and Blackberries require to be grown on a fence or wire support for the long limp canes. They fruit on new seasons growth which originates from vines grown the previous summer/autumn.

In July prune out all old canes that carried fruit last season and tie up all the new canes that have been grown through the autumn.

Black Currants fruit on wood grown the previous season. Hence, in July prune out all old wood and shorten the bush by about one third.

Red and White Currants should be pruned the same as gooseberries.

Gooseberries fruit on spurs which last several years, but best fruit is on young ones, so cut out aged wood.

Blueberries fruit on wood grown the previous season. Therefore to both keep the bush under control and to maintain good fruiting, prune the growth that has carried the crop as soon as it is picked, in summer. This encourages new growth from a lower level maintaining a compact bush. Water well in summer to encourage this new growth.

Grapes require a support which could be a fence or pergola. Initial pruning will be to establish the main leaders.

Once this has been done, prune for fruiting.

They fruit on new seasons growth. Hence in July, cut back to within one—two buds of the main leaders.

                First remove all perennial weeds, such as couch and dock, with a fork and then with a rotary hoe cultivate a seed bed about 20cm deep. Hollows and high places must be levelled out. Use a long board as well as much tramping with your heals - this will find all the soft spots that would sink and create hollows after the very first rain. A roller is not suitable at this stage for developing a level surface as it will simply roll the mounds and straddle the low bits.

                Most lawns are sown with fine leafed grass seed such as Fescue and Browntop and this is fine for a show lawn. But for a hard wearing lawn that will take the punishment of family cricket and playful dogs select a lawn mixture that contains some Rye in the mix. Clover is not recommended in a good lawn as it produces a large head of leaves that spread over a largish area in summer then shrinks back in winter, allowing weeds to take over before the clover re-grows.

                Because the seed is so small divide the whole lot into four parts and sow up and down the area then across as well as diagonally for an even coverage. Rake the seed in very lightly and roll. Moisten each morning to stop the birds from enjoying wonderful dust baths and you will find cats are not fond of digging damp soil either. Moisture is also vital for germination.  When the grass is 6cm to 8cm high it may be cut with a lawn mower set high.

                OLD LAWNS that are only slightly uneven and have good grass can be transformed into a really nice lawn. Spray out dandelions and daisies and 

            Autumn is the best time to sow a NEW LAWN and rejuvenate an old lawn. Lawns establish better from March to mid April when the autumn rains will soak well into the soil while it is still warm.

                First remove all perennial weeds, such as couch and dock, with a fork and then with a rotary hoe cultivate a seed bed about 20cm deep. Hollows and high places must be levelled out. Use a long board as well as much tramping with your heals - this will find all the soft spots that would sink and create hollows after the very first rain. A roller is not suitable at this stage for developing a level surface as it will simply roll the mounds and straddle the low bits.

                Most lawns are sown with fine leafed grass seed such as Fescue and Browntop and this is fine for a show lawn. But for a hard wearing lawn that will take the punishment of family cricket and playful dogs select a lawn mixture that contains some Rye in the mix. Clover is not recommended in a good lawn as it produces a large head of leaves that spread over a largish area in summer then shrinks back in winter, allowing weeds to take over before the clover re-grows.

                Because the seed is so small divide the whole lot into four parts and sow up and down the area then across as well as diagonally for an even coverage. Rake the seed in very lightly and roll. Moisten each morning to stop the birds from enjoying wonderful dust baths and you will find cats are not fond of digging damp soil either. Moisture is also vital for germination.  When the grass is 6cm to 8cm high it may be cut with a lawn mower set high.

                OLD LAWNS that are only slightly uneven and have good grass can be transformed into a really nice lawn. Spray out dandelions and daisies and rake or scarify up old thatched grasses that tend to choke out a lot of lawn grass which is often the cause of a thin patchy lawn. Fill in the low areas with soil and tramp, rake, level and sow lawn seed. Scatter some seed over scarified area and sprinkle a little top soil on top of the seed and keep it moist to help the germination.

            If GRASS GRUB has been a problem in the past, attack these pesky pests immediately. Many families of young grubs are silently underground eating the grass roots and it is not until the damage has already been done that we notice the destruction. If damage is already beginning to show sprinkle Soil Insect Killer over the lawn on a mild dewy night.

rake or scarify up old thatched grasses that tend to choke out a lot of lawn grass which is often the cause of a thin patchy lawn. Fill in the low areas with soil and tramp, rake, level and sow lawn seed. Scatter some seed over scarified area and sprinkle a little top soil on top of the seed and keep it moist to help the germination.

            If GRASS GRUB has been a problem in the past, attack these pesky pests immediately. Many families of young grubs are silently underground eating the grass roots and it is not until the damage has already been done that we notice the destruction. If damage is already beginning to show sprinkle Soil Insect Killer over the lawn on a mild dewy night.